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Topic: the Eric Mays Saga contiues
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Judge tells Flint Councilman Eric Mays: 'You don't know what you're doing' in drunken driving case
Flint Councilman Eric Mays defends himself against criminal misdeamnor charges, including drunken driving, in Flint District Court today, May 20.
Ron Fonger | MLive.com
Print Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 20, 2014 at 6:25 PM, updated May 20, 2014 at 8:19 PM
FLINT, MI -- City Councilman Eric Mays is getting his day in court on drunken driving and other charges.

But with Mays acting as his own attorney, Tuesday, May 20, was anything but standard operating procedure in Flint District Court.

Judge Nathaniel C. Perry told the councilman, "You are your own worst enemy," and "You don't know what you're doing," after Mays declined an offer from attorney Nicholas Robinson to represent him.

Perry warned Mays to "stop the soap-boxing" when he didn't answer a question directly and told him several times not to turn his back while speaking to him.

He warned the councilman once that he may be backing his "way into contempt charges."

"You misunderstand the whole idea of court rules," the judge said. "If you need help, you probably should ask for it."

"(The case is about) whether or not you drank and drove," Perry told Mays at one point. "It's not about a conspiracy" against him, the judge said.

Mays and special city attorney Michael J. Gildner agreed to a five-woman, two-man jury after several hours of questioning potential jurors Tuesday, and Perry ordered them to return to court at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, May 22, to begin hearing testimony in the case.

Mays faces five misdemeanor charges tied to a November arrest in which police allege they found him trying to change a tire on a vehicle with four blown-out or missing tires and which was facing the wrong way on I-475 at the time.

The charges against Mays include operating a vehicle while intoxicated, possession of marijuana, no proof of insurance, failure to report an accident and refusal to be fingerprinted.

Although the trial only started Tuesday, Mays suggested in jury questioning that he was targeted someone willing to "put stuff in your drinks" and "cut tires" on the vehicle involved in the incident.

"It's possible that somebody might have slipped something into a drink," he said. "I believe 20 percent of the people are good ... but 20 percent of the people ain't of God. They just do bad stuff."

Although Gildner allowed Mays to do most of the talking during jury selection today, the special prosecutor asked potential jurors to imagine a car being driven with two tires missing and two others flat.

"If a vehicle is just driving around on its rims, is that a safety hazard?" he asked one juror.

Gildner asked another juror if they could imagine a circumstance in which police officers "are just making it all up" when they report finding one person outside the disabled vehicle.

The man they arrested told police he was out drinking and that he "messed up" and was trying to fix his tire, Gildner said.

Here's some of what else happened in the court proceedings:

Perry approved a motion from Gildner to block Mays' attempt to subpoena some witnesses, including City Attorney Peter Bade and Emergency Manager Darnell Earley. Gildner said Mays was trying to bring political figures into the trial to "take the jury's eye off the ball."
Among the witnesses Mays said he intends to call: Former Genesee County Sheriff Joe Wilson, whom the councilman said has information about the vehicle involved in the incident. Wilson has worked for the Patsy Lou Williamson auto dealership, from which Mays said the car was on loan.
Mays' questioning was confusing at some points to several jurors and potential jurors, who told him they didn't understand his questions.
Flint attorney Frank Manley initially filed an appearance to represent Mays in the case but withdrew that representation late last month. Robinson, who offered to represent Mays today, is an attorney with the same firm, The Manley Firm.
Mays initially said he wanted some assistance from Robinson but wanted to represent himself in the case. The councilman said he was prepared to handle management of the case against him, saying he had "watched a lot of TV" involving court cases.
Mays said officials inside Flint City Hall have been engaged in a "grand conspiracy" to remove him from office since his election in 2013.
Earley, Mayor Dayne Walling and multiple city councilmen called for Mays to resign following the arrest.
Post Wed May 21, 2014 2:18 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Quote:

"councilman said he was prepared to handle management of the case against him, saying he had "watched a lot of TV" involving court cases.
Mays said officials inside Flint City Hall have been engaged in a "grand conspiracy" to remove him from office since his election in 2013."

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The comments are not kind to Mays nor to the First Ward that elected him.
Post Wed May 21, 2014 2:21 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Cop tells jury: Flint councilman cursed police, admitted to drinking and driving
Print Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 22, 2014 at 1:00 PM, updated May 22, 2014 at 1:05 PM


FLINT, MI -- City Councilman Eric Mays admitted to drinking and driving after crashing the car he was driving before his Nov. 30 arrest, two police officers testified in Flint District Court Thursday, May 22.

Mays, who is acting as his own attorney, is facing five misdemeanor charges including drunken driving and possession of marijuana.

He did not make an opening statement to jurors as his trial opened, but told Judge Nathaniel Perry that the judge had undermined his ability to defend himself by ruling potential exhibits and witnesses as not relevant to the charges against him.

"I have a strategy ... The heart of it has been ripped out," said Mays, who sought to subpoena Flint Emergency Manager Darnell Earley and City Attorney Peter Bade.

"This is not going to be politicized," Perry told Mays, who has clashed with Earley since he was elected to City Council last year.

Special Prosecutor Michael J. Gildner told jurors Thursday that Mays admitted to police that he had been drinking and driving in the early morning hours of Nov. 30.

Gildner said police found Mays talking on a cell phone outside a damaged car that was facing the wrong way on I-475 in Genesee Township at about 3 a.m. Nov. 30.

Flint police were also called to the scene because the accident appeared related to a reported wrong-way driver and accident that occurred in the city of Flint.

Former Genesee Township police Officer Alexander Knopp testified that Mays was initially polite and respectful when police arrived at the scene, telling him he had been celebrating his election at a former union hall.

The silver four-door Chevrolet Mays admitted to having driven was leaking fluids, had sustained damage to the body and had a broken axle, a flat tire and two tires missing, Knopp said.

Knopp said Mays had slurred speech and rambled in his conversation, telling him he had "messed up" and needed help keeping the incident quiet.

After Flint police arrived and patted down Mays, the councilman started cursing and became "angry and hostile," the officer said.

Mays challenged Knopp, the first witness in the case, about his testimony during cross-examination.

Flint police were expected to testify today in the case, and Gildner said the case could go to the jury later in the day.
Post Thu May 22, 2014 2:08 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint Councilman Eric Mays removes dentures to prove point during trial
Print Amanda Emery | aemery@mlive.com By Amanda Emery | aemery@mlive.com

on May 22, 2014 at 6:00 PM, updated May 22, 2014 at 6:02 PM


FLINT, MI – The trial of Flint City Councilman Eric Mays was scheduled to continue with more testimony Friday, May 30.

Mays, serving as his own attorney, contested testimony in court Thursday afternoon, May 22, from a Flint Police sergeant that she had observed him for 15 minutes before his Breathalyzer test was administered. He then removed his dentures while cross examining her, after asking if it was possible for dentures to give a false reading.

Mays went on in his cross-examination of the sergeant if she was aware he had dentures at the time of his Nov. 30, arrest while she was observing him and she replied "no." Mays then called into question the results of the Breathalyzer and earlier testimony that he appeared to be intoxicated.

Special Prosecutor Michael J. Gildner followed up asking if the results of the Breathalyzer was higher than .08 percent, and she replied "yes." The sergeant testified with her 19-years experience as a police officer, she was able to determine by Mays demeanor, mood swings, and agitation during the Nov. 30, arrest that he was "highly intoxicated."

Gildner said police found Mays talking on a cell phone outside a damaged car that was facing the wrong way on I-475 in Genesee Township at about 3 a.m. Nov. 30.

Flint police were also called to the scene because the accident appeared related to a reported wrong-way driver and accident that occurred in the city of Flint.

The trial began Thursday, May 22, with Mays facing five misdemeanor charges including drunken driving and possession of marijuana. Mays did not make an opening statement to jurors but did tell Judge Nathaniel Perry that the judge had undermined his ability to defend himself by ruling potential exhibits and witnesses as not relevant to the charges against him.

Gildner told jurors Thursday that Mays admitted to police that he had been drinking and driving in the early morning hours of Nov. 30.

Court was recessed briefly before the Flint District Court House was evacuated due to a power outage around 3:45 p.m.

The trial will continue Friday, May 30, at 9:30 a.m. in Judge Perry's courtroom with the prosecution calling another witness, then Mays will call from his witness list.

Amanda Emery is a police reporter for MLive-Flint Journal. Contact her at aemery@mlive.com or 810-285-0792. Follow her on Twitter or Facebook.
Post Thu May 22, 2014 9:08 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Testimony begins in trial for Flint City Councilman Eric Mays

Posted: May 22, 2014 5:21 PM EDT
Updated: May 22, 2014 5:58 PM EDT

By Lori Dougovito - bio | email


FLINT (WJRT) - (05/22/14) - Testimony is underway in the trial for Flint City Councilman Eric Mays.

He's representing himself.

First up was the first officer to respond when the call when out about a car, facing the wrong way, on I-475.

That officer, former Genesee Township Police Officer Alexander Knopp, said Mays admitted he had been drinking, at UAW Local 599, and driving and that no one else had been in the car.

"He said he was out celebrating a recount election he had won," said Knopp. "He stated, several times, he was out drinking Grey Goose vodka with Don Williamson and that Don was going to be very mad because he crashed his car."

Knopp said Mays was polite, admitted he messed up and wanted the encounter kept quiet so he wouldn't get into trouble.

When Flint City officers arrived?

"He became aggressive," said former Flint Police Officer Keenan Sugg. "Back and forth mood swings."

"You will not get away with this," Knopp testified. "You may charge me, but I will not see my day in court."

Mays faces five charges accused of driving drunk, possession of marijuana, not reporting the accident, refusing to be fingerprinted and having no proof of insurance for the Nov. 30 incident and arrest.

Special Prosecutor Michael Gildner indicated, during his opening statement, before testimony, that the car damaged was registered or belonged to former Flint Mayor Don Williamson's wife's car dealership.

We spoke with former Williamson, by phone, and he says he wasn't with Mays.

The case picks up, with more testimony, May 30.
Post Fri May 23, 2014 7:36 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

? Did Mays say Williamson was with him at the party? Mays was allegedly hanging out with Ed Taylor. Mays now claims he never told police Williamson was with him.

Mays did a 20 minute interview on WFNT 1470 with Mike Killbreath yesterday and today Killbreath is interviewing an attorney. (Bard Norris of Oakland County)

The dentures may affect a Breathalyzer test marginally, but Mays would need an expert to testify. The 1.1 reading possibly be lowered slightly/ Jury should require expert testimony to consider.

Individuals deny asking mays to attend the party. Allegedly he called the guy at he door and asked if he could attend with no money.

After Killbeath paid Mays bond, Mays told officers he had no water and his cable was disconnected at his home..

Mays may have more legal problems after he publicly stated another councilman gave him a spiked drink. That councilman has witnesses to disprove that lie.
Post Fri May 23, 2014 7:49 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Eric Mays defends self, removes dentures to prove point during trial
by Walter Smith-Randolph
Posted: 05.22.2014 at 6:45 PM

Eric Mays shows off his dentures in court Thursday / Walter Smith-Randolph
Photo
FLINT -- Testimony began today in the drunk driving trial of Flint city councilman Eric Mays. Police testifying Thursday, saying Mays admitted fault the night he was arrested but that testimony was not heard without bizarre courtroom spectacle.

Objection after objection was called out Wednesday as Flint city councilman Eric Mays began defending himself against drunk driving charges.

“I'm doing my best to try and represent myself,” says Mays.

The city councilman’s best includes removing his dentures in court, saying they interfered with his breathalyzer test the night he was arrested.

"I had to prove my point to the jury. These people are not telling the truth and didn't do a thorough job," says Mays.

Mays is accused of driving drunk, the wrong way on Interstate 475 last November.

“He had stated several times that he messed up and that he had wanted me to try to keep this quiet because he did not want to get in any trouble,” says Alex Knopp, a former Genesee Township police officer who testified in court Thursday.

Mays grilled police officers, who say, Mays told them he had been out celebrating his election recount victory with a former Flint mayor.

“He was out drinking Grey Goose vodka with Don Williamson and that Don would be very mad because he crashed his car,” says Knopp.

“I’m telling you, I ain't (sic) told nobody I was out drinking with Don Williamson,” says Mays. He maintains he was set-up and this trial is just a way to get him to resign.

“I haven't resigned yet and I don't plan to resign,” adds Mays.

Mays’ trial will continue on May 30th at 9:30 a.m.
Post Fri May 23, 2014 5:22 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Eric saying the dentures interfered with the test is not expert testimony. Should the jury even consider this claim in their deliberations?

There are some claiming the officer's testimony that Mays stated he was drinking with Don Williamson is proof of a conspiracy. People at the party say he was drinking Grey Goose vodka with former 2nd ward Councilman Ed Taylor and others. Photos were on Facebook showing Mays allegedly down on the floor unable to get up at the union hall event, Facebook comments also claimed there is a phone video of Mays sucking a woman's toes during the event.

Mays needs to be or careful of the allegations he makes of another councilman drugging his drink. That allegation is being vigorously disputed and a slander lawsuit may be in the making. Mays was heard making this allegation to Channel 25, who did not run with it, and he reiterated this claim in a 20 minute interview with Mike Killbreath on the WFNT 1470 radio show.

One question is whether Mays is admitting he was impaired while driving or just trying to dirty a fellow councilamn.
Post Fri May 23, 2014 5:40 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Police officer says Flint councilman was legally drunk after arrest near damaged car
Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 30, 2014 at 1:34 PM


FLINT, MI -- City Councilman Eric Mays registered blood alcohol readings of 0.11 and 0.10 percent on the day of his drunken driving arrest, the Flint police officer who administered the test told jurors in Flint District Court today, May 30.
The legal blood alcohol limit for operating a vehicle in Michigan is 0.8 percent.
Officer Steven Wheeler, who testified that he carried out the testing, was one of four prosecution witnesses so far today in the drunken driving case against Mays.
Police and prosecutors allege Mays crashed a vehicle Nov. 30 near a former union hall near the old Buick City complex in Flint before driving it the wrong way with four damaged or missing tires on I-475.
Two more witness are expected to be called by special prosecutor Michael Gildner after a lunch break today -- in advance of Mays' opening statement to the seven-member jury.
Mays is acting as his own attorney in the case, and asked few questions of Wheeler. The first-term councilman has yet to acknowledge that he was even driving the wrecked vehicle that police said they found him outside of and that was on loan from the Patsy Lou Williamson car dealership in Flint Township.
Judge Nathaniel Perry overruled seven separate objections from Mays during testimony today.
Anothony Brown, used car manager for Patsy Lou, also testified today that Mays worked as a "bird dog" for the business, bringing potential customers into the dealership.
Brown said Mays was loaned the vehicle about a month before his arrest and said the car was insured.
The charges against Mays include operating a vehicle while intoxicated, possession of marijuana, no proof of insurance, failure to report an accident and refusal to be fingerprinted.
Flint police Sgt. Michael Dumanois told jurors today that he was the first officer from Flint on the scene of the Mays arrest and said the councilman admitted to drinking alcohol.
"Your words to me were that you were drinking Grey Goose and you were going to accept responsibility," Dumanois said.
The sergeant said he was dispatched to the accident by a 911 operator, who reported the discovery of the damaged car in Genesee Township that was possibly connected to an accident that ocurred about three miles away in the city of Flint.
Post Fri May 30, 2014 4:03 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Judge Halts Flint Councilman Eric Mays Defense (Breaking)

By Dan Foley May 30, 2014 4:05 PM



Mike Killbreath reports that Judge Perry, who is presiding over the trial of Flint Councilman Eric Mays on charges relating to a November 30th incident in which he is alleged to have been driving while impaired, has halted the proceeding.

Mays, who is representing himself, called Johnny Billings to the stand and asked if he was driving on the night of November 30th, 2013. Judge Perry immediately stopped the proceeding and asked the jury to leave. He then appointed Attorney Chris Ebbott, who was in attendance, to represent Billings [not Mays, as originally reported] and join the judge in chambers.

Upon returning, Attorney Ebbott advised the court that Mr. Billings would be taking the 5th.

We will update the story as information comes in.

Addition:

In light of the reported developments, Judge Perry has adjourned the proceeding until June 12. When asked by Mike Killbreath if he had been driving the car involved in the incident, Billings replied:

“I’m a fifth kind of guy.”




Read More: Judge Halts Flint Councilman Eric Mays Defense (Breaking) | http://wfnt.com/judge-halts-flint-councilman-eric-mays-defense-breaking/?trackback=tsmclip
Post Sat May 31, 2014 7:36 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Witness pleads the fifth after Flint Councilman Eric Mays asks if he was real wrong-way driver

Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 30, 2014 at 5:39 PM, updated May 30, 2014 at 5:40 PM




FLINT, MI --A witness refused to answer today, May 30, after Flint Councilman Eric Mays asked if he was driving May's vehicle on the night the councilman was arrested for drunken driving.

Johnny Billings of Flint, the second witness Mays called in his defense against five misdemeanor charges in Flint District Court, was asked one question before claiming his Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination, leaving a seven-member jury to wonder what his answer might have been.

Neither Billings nor Mays would answer questions from MLive-The Flint Journal about who was driving a vehicle that had been loaned to Mays in the early morning hours of Nov. 30.

Police have said they found Mays outside the car, which was facing the wrong way with missing and damaged tires, on I-475 at about 3 a.m. that day.

No witnesses have testified to having seen Mays drive the vehicle on the night in question, but police witnesses have said he confessed to driving drunk the night of his arrest.

An officer testified today that Mays tested above the legal limit for blood alcohol level, and prosecutors have charged him with operating a vehicle while intoxicated, possession of marijuana, no proof of insurance, failure to report an accident and refusal to be fingerprinted.

"I'm disappointed in the truthfulness" of police testimony, said Mays, who is acting as his own attorney in the case, which has now stretched on for three days.

The appearance by Billings topped off the third day in the trial, which is scheduled to resume June 12.

At one point today, District Judge Nathaniel Perry admonished Mays for his line of questioning with one witness, telling the councilman, "Just have a seat and be quiet."

Perry later slammed his fist on the desk in front of him, telling Mays again, "Please be quiet."

A moment before, special prosecutor Michael Gildner, who objected repeatedly to May's comments and questions to witnesses, said the councilman "does not know process ... doesn't know what he's doing" in court.

During his opening argument, after Gildner rested the prosecution's case, Mays told the jury that he's doing the best he can to represent himself.

"I don't know all the rules of the attorneys or the courts," he said. "I know the truth."
Post Sat May 31, 2014 7:41 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

AC Dumas was in court this morning for the sentencing. Here are his Facebook comments:


AC Dumas Eric Mays didn't follow court orders. Asking the judge to stay sentencing. Prosecutor Attorney asked Judge not to stay appeal. Recess while Mays reads report from Prosecutor Attorney.

4 hours ago · Like
..


AC Dumas Mays representing himself on appeal and at sentencing. Judge has ruled that Councilman Eric Mays' request for "stay" for sentencing is DENIED!

3 hours ago · Like · 1
..

Kimberly Blair What happened?

3 hours ago · Like
..

AC Dumas Judge Perry adjourned sentencing until August 15th!

3 hours ago · Like
..

Kimberly Blair Why

3 hours ago · Like
..

AC Dumas Didn't have money to go to intake assessments @ Catholic Charities. They don't come the jail anymore for assessments. The judge asked the question to the deputy sheriff in the court. This indicates to me that the Judge may give Mays some jail time. The Prosecuting Attorney asked him to be sentenced to 93 days in jail. Mays has filed an appeal to the Circuit Court. Judge Farmhouse has been assigned to appeal hesring.

3 hours ago · Like
Post Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:18 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Judge delays sentencing for Flint Councilman Eric Mays, special prosecutor calls for jail time


Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on July 18, 2014 at 1:11 PM


FLINT, MI -- A Flint District Court judge delayed the sentencing of city Councilman Eric Mays for impaired driving today, July 18, after Mays failed to get a substance abuse assessment in advance of a hearing.

Judge Nathaniel Perry III agreed to postpone the sentencing until Aug. 15 after Mays asked for a delay, saying he didn't have the money to pay for the assessment initially and had been to Catholic Charities today -- before his court appearance -- but discovered he needed an appointment.

"I didn't know you couldn't drop in and out ...," Mays said. "I'm not on drugs or alcohol. The Catholic Charities report will prove that I'm not on drugs and alcohol."

Special prosecutor Michael Gildner asked Perry to sentence Mays to 93 days in jail and not to delay sentencing.

Perry granted the delay, but said Mays "had (been given) ample opportunity to take care this."

Mays was originally charged with five separate misdemeanors related to a Nov. 30 arrest when police said they witnessed him outside a disabled car, which was facing the wrong way on Interstate 475 at about 3 a.m.

Last month, a jury found Mays not guilty of three misdemeanors -- replacing one of the five with the guilty verdict on a lesser charge, impaired driving -- and deadlocked on another charge.

The jury found Mays not guilty of operating a vehicle while intoxicated, possession of marijuana and refusing to be fingerprinted in connection with the incident.

Gildner argued the case still merits a maximum 93 days in jail for Mays.

"The city recognizes that most Courts do not sentence the 'typical' first offender to jail time, but this case is not typical," Gildner wrote in a sentencing memorandum. "This case merits the minimum penalty the Court can impose because of the unique hazards that the Defendant's conduct posed.

"Drivers are not looking out for cars traveling towards them on one-way streets. This is especially true on highways where drivers are allowed to travel at high rates of speed because of fewer stops and other hazards that we encounter on local roads."

Mays, who has represented himself in court, is attempting to appeal his conviction on the impaired charge and filed paperwork in Genesee Circuit Court, attempting to do that this week.

He has contended he was unfairly shut down by Perry before he could complete his closing remarks to the jury during his five-day trial.

"This court knows when I was able to attack the the elements of OUIL, I got a not guilty ...," Mays said. "Had I had 5 more minutes of closing I would have covered" all the charges against me.

The councilman said he had no choice but to defer to Perry's order that he end his closing argument before he finished.

"If I did not be quiet, I believe I would have been found in contempt of court," he said.

Gildner asked Perry not to delay the sentencing today and asked that Mays be required to pay the cost of his having to appear again in court on behalf of the city of Flint -- a request Perry denied.

Gildner's sentencing memorandum says it was "pure luck" that Mays did not strike an unsuspecting motorist by driving the wrong way on a side street and then on I-475.

Tests showed May's had a blood alcohol level of .10 and .11, but Mays argued that the prosecutor was never able to show he was driving the car that had been loaned to him before the accident.

The Mays trial was marked by unusual twists, including a witness who claimed his 5th amendment right against self incrimination when asked if he was the wrong-way driver, Mays removing his dentures in front of the jury to demonstrate problems with his blood alcohol test, and multiple warnings from Perry that he was considering finding Mays in contempt of court.

Ron Fonger is a reporter for The Flint Journal. Contact him at rfonger1@mlive.com or 810-347-9963. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook orGoogle+.
Post Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:23 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint city attorney report: Councilman Eric Mays used vulgarity, attempted to intimidate city employees


Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on September 23, 2014 at 7:00 AM, updated September 23, 2014 at 8:43 AM

FLINT, MI -- Flint's city attorney says Councilman Eric Mays violated the city charter and abused his office by cursing at and attempting to intimidate city employees.

City Attorney Peter Bade made the claims in an Aug. 29 investigative report, which says Mays confronted Flint's chief development official in August, demanding to be called "sir," screaming, and repeatedly using profanity inside City Hall.

Mays said Tuesday, Sept. 16, that he disagrees with Bade's report, and said affidavits collected from city employees about the incident are filled with half-truths, and blamed Flint emergency manager Darnell Earley for orchestrating the investigation in an effort to remove him from office.

Bade's report says the incident occurred Aug. 5 when Mays, who represents the city's 1st Ward, confronted Jesse Buchanan, Flint's chief development official, about the condemnation of an apartment building.

The report, obtained by The Flint Journal, says "numerous employees complained about (Mays') behavior on that date with respect to a loud and intimidating confrontation" in which the councilman "repeatedly used vulgarity" and told Buchanan "if this were out on the street, this would be a different story."

Mays said the report doesn't tell the whole story, but said he "responded maybe in what some would say (an) unprofessional" way, and said he "was kind of fussing and cussing" during the incident.

Mays said Bade's investigation did not include all relevant information, including actions by Buchanan before the confrontation and said the report is more evidence he's been targeted by Earley.

"I'm appalled at Mr. Earley," Mays said. "He wants to come at me from all angles. Before I let Darnell Earley take me out, we'll all be in court. I've been elected in a democratic process."

City spokesman Jason Lorenz said Earley would not comment on the report because it is a confidential communication between attorney and client, and Bade also declined to comment.

Mays said he spoke to Buchanan on Aug. 6 about Glen Acre apartments, a Pierson Road complex that was partially condemned by the city last month after a water shutoff.

Water service has since been restored after the city received at least a partial payment on a past-due water bill for part of the property, and officials have said they mistakenly posted condemnation notices on some of the buildings there.

Bade's report says Mays' conduct in City Hall "clearly violated" the city charter's prohibition against council members giving orders to city employees instead of dealing with city administrators, and violated an emergency manager's order that forbids Mays specifically from directly communicating with city staff.

The report concludes that Mays' behavior "constitutes an illegal interference with the administration of municipal services and was an attempt to intimidate city employees," but doesn't indicate any consequence for Mays.

The latest rift is just the latest conflict between Mays and others inside City Hall, particularly Earley. Among the past incidents:
•Mays accused city attorneys of piling on criminal charges against him after he was charged with five misdemeanors in a drunken driving and marijuana possession case earlier this year. He was found not guilty of three of the charges against him and guilty of a lesser charge of impaired driving.
•Earley joined Mayor Dayne Walling and council President Scott Kincaid in calling for Mays' resignation in December following his arrest in the same case.
•Earley issued an order Dec. 13 that said Mays could communicate with the emergency manager using only email and could not talk to city staff because of "loud, uncivil, unprofessional, aggressive and erratic behavior."
•Mays said in July that the mayor and City Council have the authority and should vote to remove Earley from his post, something that never materialized.

• In 2013, a Genesee County District Court jury Friday found Mays guilty of disrupting a meeting of a public body after he spoke too long at a public hearing the previous year.


•As recently as May, City Council President Scott Kincaid asked police to remove Mays from a meeting after the two argued over how the meeting was being run, including what order Kincaid was recognizing council members to speak.
Post Tue Sep 23, 2014 8:33 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

I found Jesse Buchanan to be honest when he was questioned about his electric company. I don't believe he would lie about Mays.

Mays has a history of abusive behavior towards anyone who thwarts his actions. Look at his PPO filed against him by former councilman Kerry Nelson. Mays had a contract to lobby for a liquor license and Nelson declined the license because of issues at the store. Mays threw an angry tirade in the lobby and tried to enter council offices. Mays tried to intimidate Nelson, but failed.
Post Tue Sep 23, 2014 8:40 am 
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