FAQFAQ   SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlistRegisterRegister  ProfileProfile   Log in[ Log in ]  Flint Talk RSSFlint Talk RSS

»Home »Open Chat »Political Talk  »Flint Journal »Political Jokes »The Bob Leonard Show  

Flint Michigan online news magazine. We have lively web forums


FlintTalk.com Forum Index > Political Talk

Topic: Flint administration doesn't value our seniors
Goto page 1, 2  Next
  Author    Post Post new topic Reply to topic
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The Important Role of Senior Centers to the Local Community

How important are senior centers to older adults?

Recently the California Commission on Aging conducted a research project to examine the existing understanding about senior centers.

They found that senior centers are designated as community focal points that not only provide helpful resources to older adults, but serve the entire community with information on aging; support for family caregivers, training professionals and students; and developments of innovative approaches to aging issues. ¹

In 2008, the Commonwealth of PA funded a study of older adults in the state titled: “Understanding the Impact of Senior Community Center Participation on Elders’ Health and Wellbeing.” ²

Study findings suggest:

Activity participation is essential to quality of life.
Activity has important life benefits:
o Reduces risk of depression
o Reduces global cognitive decline
o Enhances social connectedness
The role of senior centers will continue to expand and have an increasing impact on structuring the quality of life of older adults.
We need more systematic evaluation of programs, members and partnering with researchers to evaluate program effectiveness
Both the California and Pennsylvania studies conclude that successful aging is more likely when individuals are actively engaged in life. Senior centers are one of the most accessible, friendly and inexpensive places that offer programs and services that promote active engagement and enjoyment of life by older adults.

Senior Centers around Pennsylvania recognize the increasing and changing needs of older adults in the community.

The following list of activities and services are typical of programs offered by many senior centers.

Nutrition Programs
o Daily meals served at the centers
o Other wellness programs
Exercise classes including Aerobics, Tai Chi, Yoga, Arthritis Foundation
Health Services
o Blood pressure checks, flu shots, hearing assessments and diabetes management
o Functional Fitness Assessment
o Support groups (Alzheimers and Parkinsons)
Information and Assistance
o Education and guidance in understanding medicare and insurance
o Referral and connection to appropriate community support services
Education Classes
o Computer Classes
- Effective Word Processing
- Effective Internet usage and Skype Program
- Microsoft Suite of products education
o Foreign language classes
o Discussion groups
Financial Literacy
o AARP tax preparation
o Avoiding identity theft
o Tax topics for the elderly
o Basic financial planning
Social Events and Programs
o Senior Chorale, Orchestra and Band
o Monthly entertainment, birth- day parties
o Chess club, bridge
The PA and CA research found that senior centers need to continue to adapt, drawing on their strengths and relationships with community partners and organizations to become more of a hub, linking individuals to a wider range of activities and services in the community.

Kathy Sullivan, Executive Director of the West Chester Area Senior Center in West Chester, PA describes the role of senior centers as “a place for older adults to meet for services and activities that reflect their experience and skills, respond to their diverse needs and interests, enhance their dignity, support their independence and encourage their involvement in the center and community.”

Editorial provided by Lorri Sarosy, West Chester Area Senior Center, West Chester, PA.

¹ California Commission on Aging, Senior Center Literature Review, Teresa Dal Santo, Ph.D., 2009

² Importance of Activity: What the Research Shows in Support of Senior Center Programming. Jefferson Center for Applied Research on Aging and Health, Thomas Jefferson University, 2008.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 9:48 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint senior center could lose funding due to dispute over lease agreement

Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com By Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com

on December 27, 216 at 5:18 PM, updated December 27, 2016 at 6:10 PM

FLINT, MI -- The fate of a senior center on Flint's north side is unknown as city officials look to potentially increase the facility's rent payment from $1 to $12,000 per year to help defray maintenance costs.

Board members at Hasselbring Senior Center have until Jan. 1 to finalize a lease agreement for a building or they could lose thousands of dollars in millage funds, which could affect programming for the city's senior community.

Hasselbring Senior Center is a non-profit organization. The center's only connection to the city is the lease agreement for the city-owned Home Avenue facility, which expired Sept. 30.

The recently-expired lease between Hasselbring and Flint called for $1 per year payment to the city for the building. According the center's budget, Hasselbring paid for lawn care and snow removal at the property.

Hasselbring board members directed questions on the issue to board President Percy Knapp, who could not be reached for comment.

Flint City Administrator Sylvester Jones said the city can't afford to foot repair costs for the building and the $1 per year payment doesn't help ease the financial woes of maintaining the center for the city.

Jones previously said he was looking to draft an agreement requiring the center pay $1,000 per month for rent and for the city and the center to split the cost of maintenance and repairs at the building.

"The City of Flint is not opposed to renewing a lease with the nonprofit to ensure that services and activities continue to Flint residents," said Jones.

He added the city has four concerns involving the lease agreement with the center, including a monthly lease payment to help cover expenses affiliated with the center, an insurance policy that also names the city as an additional insured, sharing the cost of maintenance and repairs and other miscellaneous expenses with the facility.

According to a 2014 resolution signed by then-Flint emergency manager Darnell Earley, Hasselbring received $20,000 to assist in transferring ownership of the building to the senior center and repairs to the facility.

"Beginning with the County's fiscal year 2014-15, October, 2014 it is the intent of each entity to obtain their own Senior Millage allocation independent of the City and to purchase the buildings they currently operate," reads the June 26, 2014, order. "The City will no longer maintain the buildings nor receive Senior Millage funds to operate the Senior Centers and wishes to pass this function on to the non-profit community."

Jones said this is one reason why the city shouldn't pay for maintenance costs associated with the center.

"It's my understanding that the money was paid out," Jones said. "You can lease these facilities, but you need to make sure you do what you are supposed to for maintenance and repairs."

Jones said the city is still responsible for various repairs on the building, similar to a standard landlord-tenant rental agreement, since the city owns the building.

Jones added he didn't have documentation at the time showing expenses the city paid this year to cover repairs at Hasselbring.

According to the center's budget, the group spent $1,000 on facility maintenance, $1,000 for floors and $1,200 for ground maintenance this year.

Genesee County officials say the decision is ultimately up to the Genesee County Commission as to whether the center can keep $113,826 in millage funds for 2016-17.

"There is an agreement between the Hasselbring Senior Center Board of Directors and Genesee County that they are to secure a lease with the City of Flint by Jan. 1, 2017," said Lynn Radzilowski, Genesee County Senior Services Director. "If the lease is not secured, the millage funding for the center is probably in jeopardy. It would be at the sole discretion of the Genesee County Board of Commissioners to act on and enforce a reduction, withholding, and or elimination of senior millage funding."

Radzilowski, who extended Hasselbring's deadline in October to have a lease agreement in place, said each senior center is responsible to have a lease, contract or own a building to receive millage funds.

Some Flint City Council members say the administration's refusal to let the center continue paying $1 rent shows a lack of support for senior citizens.

"Hasselbring has been an important asset to this community. If we don't do something for Hasselbring then all we will have is Brennan [Senior Center]," said Council Vice President, Vicki VanBuren. "That is not fair to the hundreds of seniors that go to Hasselbring ... for all the outstanding programs that they do."

Council members asked the administration to bring a resolution to them on the center's lease during a Dec. 7 committee meeting, but the item has not yet been presented for council approval.

"It does not make sense whatsoever," said City Council President Kerry Nelson. "This is grandstanding and politics at its best."

Nelson said he asked city interim Finance Director David Sabuda how much it would cost the city to run the center on its own. So far, officials say it would cost a minimum of $227,000 for day-to-day operations based on numbers from 2013.

"There is no way this city can afford to run these centers," Nelson said. "I have worked with this administration on a lease for Hasselbring."

The city's other center, Brennan, on Flint's south side, has a 10-year lease agreement that includes an annual $1 payment.

Jones said the administration did not support Brennan's lease of $1 per year over 10 years, but at this time the administration's hands are tied because of the center's current contract.

The next Flint City Council meeting is scheduled for Jan. 9, more than a week after the center's extension is set to end. The County Commission isn't expected to meet until Jan. 3.

There is no word on whether the commission will discuss or act on the millage issue at Hasselbring Senior Center.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 9:52 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

http://www.flinttalk.com/viewtopic.php?t=12411

With the Federal GOP working to cut social security benefits and proposed cuts to healthcare, seniors are under attack.

I was recently a Meijer's and low income seniors just opened up to describe their frustration with rising grocery prices as well as everyday expenses. Seniors from the nearby senior apartment complex were struggling to handler their walkers and other mobility equipment from the apartments down the path to the store. Once inside, some sought out the amiga's for easier mobility.

Senior Centers can facilitate assistance for the poorest of our seniors and those with no close family.

Yet under Weaver, all she and her administration seems to attempt is to ride the
crest of notoriety she gets from the water crisis.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:07 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Home Uncategorized Article
Clio Area Senior Center to close for about a month



By Randy Conat | Posted: Tue 6:56 PM, Mar 15, 2016 | Updated: Tue 7:00 PM, Mar 15, 2016

CLIO (WJRT) - (03/15/16) - The center of activity for nearly 1,000 Mid-Michigan seniors is temporarily shutting its doors. The Clio Area Senior Center will be closing for a month to make changes and improve services.


For many elderly people, the neighborhood senior center is an important part of life. It's where people gather to talk, play games, exercise or share a meal.

Seniors in the Clio area are disappointed their center won't be available to them. Vienna Township supervisor Joe Rizk says the resources at the center on Vienna Road aren't adequate and it was falling short in meeting the needs of seniors.

It will close at 5 p.m. Friday, March 18 and probably won't reopen for a month.

This will be quite a setback because many people count on it for food distribution and daily lunches. There are clogging classes and blood pressure checks. Income tax preparation services are offered here.

Rizk and others will be looking at what nearby senior centers do for their clients and will try to incorporate those ideas in Clio. The Genesee County Department of Senior Services will offer its advice to help the center become all that it can be.


"When we re-open, we will re-open, it's going to be a better facility and adaptable for the seniors that come in," Rizk said.

"I just joined and now I was looking to get in to some of the activities, but it looks like it's going to be extended a little bit longer before I can get involved," said Walt Hicks, of Thetford Township.

When the Clio Area Senior Center reopens - hopefully in mid-April - organizers say it will be a much better place.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:15 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

In Burton and some other communities, the city government works closely with the senior centers and senior housing. The schools have programs where students come in to assist the seniors with chores the seniors can't perform. Other communities contribute to the cost of the centers and some centers have investments from financial gifts made to keep them running.

But in Flint, the administration threatens to sell the buildings and wants to fill the city coffers with millage money collected. Flint residents will continue to pay the millage irregardless of any benefit the residents receive.

These Centers are built near parks, so are they part of the park property. ? If so, the City can't sell them without going to a vote of the people. Remember the uproar when the ity proposed selling park land to Landmark Grocery?
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:25 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Has the backlash already started? I understand the media stories prompted the administration's Sylvester Jones to attend a meeting at Hasselbring and lower the rent to $750 per month.

Weaver has shown herself to be easily led and not politically savvy.

The Brennan Center is letting people know her administration lied about the roof costs.Application was made and the roof was paid for with federally funded Community Block Development grants (CDBG).

This is the same administration that, in my opinion, gave an ambulance company, (and hefty campaign contributor), a free ride in leasing 3 fire stations. A for-profit company, they should be paying property taxes on the portion they lease, as the tax tribunal has ruled in other cities with similar leases. The tax tribunal cases would indicate how only leasing to a non-profit eliminates the tax liability.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:42 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Alex Harris is going about his recall wrong. He need a Freedom of Information Act request to obtain relevant documents and stated City policies. He needs to pick issues that the citizen's are concerned about and that have cost the city money.

He needs to remember that a recall is an election and must be filed as one and state campaign finance rules need to be followed.

If he eventually succeed, he needs to watch how Weaver's response is made and how she finances tha response.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:49 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

City proposes raising senior center's rent by 9000 percent
Posted: Dec 28, 2016 4:33 PM CST
Updated: Dec 28, 2016 4:55 PM CST

By Rachel McCrary
Connect

(
FLINT, MI (WNEM) -

A non-profit senior center faces an uncertain future because its landlord wants to raise rent by 9,000 percent.

The landlord is the city, which charges a dollar a year. It said it needs to recover some of its maintenance costs, but the increase could put a real pinch on the center.

"It's something for the seniors to get out of the house, have activities and stuff to do, move around," said Percy Knapp, president of the Hesselbridge Board of Directors.

Knapp said the center could be in jeopardy after the city decided to change the rent from $1 to $9,000 a year.

"That dollar a year will help keep our programs going. Cause all the money we get is allocated to our programs and serving the seniors. This would be a stab in the heart," Knapp said.

He said the center offers entertainment, food and exercise to the aging community in Flint at no cost.

The Hesselbridge Senior Community Center has been around since 1987 and the board members said at least 100 seniors visit the center each day.

The city said the dollar a year lease agreement is no longer feasible and was put into place during a different time under different management.

"The emergency manager established some agreements that don't work for the city of Flint. In addition to that, the city has to continue to have partnership groups that are mutually beneficial. We cannot continue to pay the bills for every non-profit in this community," City Administrator Sylvester Jones said.

Jones prospered a new lease agreement hoping to charge the center $750 a month with the non-profit taking care of the day to day expenses like electricity and snow removal. Jones said the center receives $113,000 annually for funding and believes it is more than fair.

"We're asking them, saying hey, this is something that is supposed to work for the city of Flint and as well as the non-profit. We are asking for terms that will not continue to take dollars away from the city in other areas," Jones said.

The city said they will continue to negotiate with the senior center board.

As for Knapp, he said he doesn't want the center to be put at risk of closing its doors because of financial reasons.

"Everybody enjoys themselves coming up here. It would be something. Quite a lot of people come through here. That would be a lot of people wiped out of the programs and stuff," Knapp said.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 11:16 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

So Jones thinks taking $12,000 is fair because the center gets $113,000 a year. And they pay water, utilities and basic upkeep on the facility.


Don't complain to me about career politicians. Someone with political savvy would never make such a rookie mistake. She needs to eliminate her croneys and get someone with some sense.

Where is Eric Mays now. He had a lot to say before. Someone needs to check for Nepotism in some City Hall positions and interns..
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 11:23 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Senior center working with City of Flint on lease agreement to avoid funding cut
By Jessica Dupnack |
Posted: Wed 5:37 PM, Dec 28, 2016

FLINT (WJRT) - (12/28/16) - One of the few places left in Flint for the elderly is working to avoid a drastic drop in funding from the county.

The Hasselbring Senior Center has had its ups and downs, changes in management and budget issues, but hundreds of senior citizens consider it a second home.

"It's like a country club, they come enjoy themselves. A lot of them, it's the only time they get transported out the house," said the center's Board of Director's president, Percy Knapp.

Knapp says their livelihood is threatened if they can't agree on a new lease contract with the City of Flint - who owns the building. They've been paying $1 per year for rent, but it will likely go up. The city says they can't afford the upkeep without an increase.

Flint City Administrator, Sylvester Jones, says Wednesday evening both sides met to discuss an agreement. While nothing is set in stone, the latest proposal includes the following :

- Monthly lease payment to the City of Flint of $750
- Mowing, plowing and other maintenance expenses must be handled by the Hasselbring Senior Center
- Lease effective from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017

If Knapp and the other members on the board agree to the terms, they will be able to continue getting funding from the Genesee County Senior Millage. That money is their only source of income.

Jones is encouraging the center to look for other resources for funding in the future.

Once they agree on terms for the lease agreement, it will go to the Flint City Council for final approval. They meet on Jan. 9.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 12:27 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Senior center working with City of Flint on lease agreement to avoid funding cut
By Jessica Dupnack |
Posted: Wed 5:37 PM, Dec 28, 2016

FLINT (WJRT) - (12/28/16) - One of the few places left in Flint for the elderly is working to avoid a drastic drop in funding from the county.

The Hasselbring Senior Center has had its ups and downs, changes in management and budget issues, but hundreds of senior citizens consider it a second home.

"It's like a country club, they come enjoy themselves. A lot of them, it's the only time they get transported out the house," said the center's Board of Director's president, Percy Knapp.

Knapp says their livelihood is threatened if they can't agree on a new lease contract with the City of Flint - who owns the building. They've been paying $1 per year for rent, but it will likely go up. The city says they can't afford the upkeep without an increase.

Flint City Administrator, Sylvester Jones, says Wednesday evening both sides met to discuss an agreement. While nothing is set in stone, the latest proposal includes the following :

- Monthly lease payment to the City of Flint of $750
- Mowing, plowing and other maintenance expenses must be handled by the Hasselbring Senior Center
- Lease effective from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017

If Knapp and the other members on the board agree to the terms, they will be able to continue getting funding from the Genesee County Senior Millage. That money is their only source of income.

Jones is encouraging the center to look for other resources for funding in the future.

Once they agree on terms for the lease agreement, it will go to the Flint City Council for final approval. They meet on Jan. 9.
Post Thu Dec 29, 2016 12:38 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Hasselbring Nonprofit Organization votes down City of Flint's lease agreement
By Jessica Dupnack |
Posted: Wed 5:37 PM, Dec 28, 2016 |
Updated: Thu 4:29 PM, Dec 29, 2016

FLINT (WJRT) - UPDATE: (12/29/16) - The leaders at Hasselbring Senior Center have voted down an offer from the City of Flint to continue leasing the building.

They've been renting from the city for $1 per year.

The city says they can't afford the upkeep at that price, so they've offered a lease of $750 per month.

The board of directors said "no" Thursday.

It's unclear what will happen to the center and the funding they get from the county to stay open.
Post Fri Dec 30, 2016 8:02 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Future of senior center still shaky after board says no to lease terms

Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com By Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com

on December 29, 2016 at 7:20 PM

FLINT, MI - The future of a senior center on Flint's north side is still in limbo after board members voted against new lease terms with the city of Flint.

Board members at Hasselbring Senior Center say the center can't afford the expenses under the new terms including paying $750 in monthly rent - a big increase from the nominal $1 per year the center has been charged by the city in the past.

"We cannot afford this lease," board member Norma Allen said. "We cannot afford to pay the maintenance on a building that we don't own. Why can't they give us the same agreement that they gave Brennan (Senior Center) for a dollar until their contract is up? If they (are going) to be fair and they want to do it right they will bring the same lease agreement. They (are going) to put us out anyway because we can't afford this. So, if the city of Flint wants us to out then let them put us out."

Under the new lease agreement, the center would be responsible for paying $750 per month, lawn care, snow removal, insurance and half of the cost of repairs to the building.

Board members at Hasselbring Senior Center have until Jan. 1 to finalize a lease agreement for a building or they could lose about $113,000 in Genesee County millage funds, which could affect programming for the city's senior community.

Board President Percy Knapp said they plan to ask the county for another extension to figure out their next move.

"They are usually pretty good about it," said Knapp. "The county does not want seniors to lose services in Flint."

Hasselbring, a non-profit organization, has been leasing its Home Avenue facility from the city but that agreement expired Sept. 30.


The fate of a senior center on Flint's north side is in the air as the center's board and city officials work out a lease agreement.

City of Flint administrator Sylvester Jones said the city can't afford to pay the expenses for the center and if Flint can't work out an agreement with the Hasselbring Senior Center they will look for another non-profit that will.

"The city would have to go back to the County Board to see if another non-profit would lease the space to continue providing senior services," Jones said. "The city is not going to stop programming for seniors in that area. If we can't work with Hasselbring then we will identify another non-profit that can do programs for seniors there."

It would cost the city a minimum of $227,000 to run the two senior centers in Flint.

Jones, who met with the center's board after the meeting, said in the end they suggested that they look for other funding sources including fundraising and advised the board to seek training.

"This decision was very disappointing to the City of Flint," said Jones of the board's decision to not accept the lease agreement. "Next step, it was suggested that the Hasselbring Nonprofit Board of Directors contract the United Way to request Board Development training."

Genesee County officials say the decision is ultimately up to the Genesee County Commission as to whether the center can keep $113,826 in millage funds for 2016-17 if they fail to meet deadline.

"There is an agreement between the Hasselbring Senior Center Board of Directors and Genesee County that they are to secure a lease with the City of Flint by Jan. 1, 2017," said Lynn Radzilowski, Genesee County Senior Services Director in an earlier interview. "If the lease is not secured, the millage funding for the center is probably in jeopardy. It would be at the sole discretion of the Genesee County Board of Commissioners to act on and enforce a reduction, withholding, and or elimination of senior millage funding."

Radzilowski, who extended Hasselbring's deadline in October to have a lease agreement in place, said each senior center is responsible to have a lease, contract or own a building to receive millage funds.

Another center, Brennan, on Flint's south side pays $1 per year in rent. The center is also responsible for any repairs $1,000 or less and they handle lawn care and snow removal.

Jones said that 10-year lease was negotiated under an emergency manager and not Weaver's administration. He added that the Brennan lease does not expire until 2024.
Post Fri Dec 30, 2016 8:11 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint officials say they're getting out of senior center business; Hasselbring subcontracted

Dominic Adams | dadams5@mlive.com By Dominic Adams | dadams5@mlive.com

on June 06, 2013 at 5:45 PM, updated June 06, 2013 at 5:46 PM
United Senior Network President Mark Rice speaks to the crowd at Hasselbring Community Center on Thursday, June 6, as 1st Ward Councilwoman Claudia Croom and Flint's Director of Infrastructure Howard Croft listen. Rice answered questions from people who attend the center after Flint outsourced Hasselbring's operation to United Senior Network. Dominic Adams | MLive.com

FLINT, MI – More than 50 seniors were at Hasselbring Community Center Thursday, June 6, for a meeting with its new manager, United Senior Network.
The meeting came after Hasselbring was abruptly closed for two days beginning Monday, June 3, while the city of Flint worked to outsource the center’s management.

“The way information was disseminated was flawed,” said Howard Croft, Flint’s director of infrastructure and development. “I don’t want to point fingers. There should be no excuse going forward.”

The center will not receive reimbursement from the county senior services property tax for the days that the center was closed and cannot transfer funding to another center without county approval, county officials previously said.

City Administrator Mike Brown said the city is getting out of the senior enter business.

“We’re getting out of the business because we have no money to operate,” he told the crowd. “We have been subsidizing the operation of the center with the general fund. It’s something the city has done in the past. They (funds) are not there anymore.”

The center reopened Wednesday, June 5.

Money collected in a county-wide millage for seniors pays $113,826 to operate the center and the city of Flint had pitched in about $5,000 from its general fund to operate the center, MLive-Flint Journal previously reported.

Flint officials will subcontract Hasselbring’s operation to United Senior Network through Sept. 30, 2014, and then hope to sell the building to United.

George Moran teaches a computer class at Hasselbring and asked United Senior Network President Mark Rice how transparent the advisory board at the center will be.

Moran said seniors ask current Advisory Board President Willie Pollard for information and they don’t get a reply.

“We’re tired of being lost,” Moran said. “We ask questions about whatever and we never get an answer.”

Rice said he’d be willing to focus on the advisory board after the fiscal year is complete Sept. 30.

County Commissioner Omar Sims, D-Flint, was at the meeting and said he’d worked with Pollard and asked the seniors to give United Senior Network a chance.

“At the end of the day, no other entity stepped forward to take on this responsibility,” Sims said. “Talk is cheap.”

Rice said United Senior Network must work to ensure it gets adequate programming in place and to ensure it best uses the millage dollars.

Rice said he’d like to find out what types of programs the members like and look to add new activities that the seniors want.

“My No. 1 one focus is to keep the doors open. I want you all to know of my devotion,” he said, adding that he grew up on Martin Luther King Boulevard near Flint Park Boulevard. “This is my community. I do care.”

Rice also introduced the staff, which includes Hasselbring’s new director, Celestine Jennings. Her salary will be approximately $20,000, Rice said, adding he didn’t know the exact figure.

Hasselbring member Johnny Billings said the center's members would like to have a chance to operate the center by creating its own nonprofit, like is currently in the works at Brennan Community Center – Flint’s other senior center.

“We got blindsided,” Billings said. “They still ain’t answered our questions.”

The Genesee County Board of Commissioners still has the final say over the United Senior Network subcontracting the center and that approval could come next week.

Dominic Adams is a reporter for MLive-Flint Journal. Contact him at dadams5@mlive.com or 810-241-8803. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook or
Post Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:33 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Another fine mess the Emergency managers created. United Seniors network was in financial difficulties when the EM contracted with them. Their goal was to purchase the building. Their last corporation filing was in 2013 and the corporation was automatically dissolved on December 1, 2016.

The management of Hasselbring has been managed by the East Side Senior center.

At the most recent meeting Sylvester Jones made a comment that they would try to break the Brennan Center Lease. Fortunately Brennan Center Director Deborah Holmes hired an attorney to represent them in negotiating their lease. The attorney says Jones can bring it on if he wants to lose the City.

In my opinion administrators like Jones don't make the transition from the corporate world to municipal governance very smoothly. Weaver is an elected official and she can't act like an Emergency Manager.
Post Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:16 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
  Display posts from previous:      
Post new topic Reply to topic

Jump to:  
Goto page 1, 2  Next

Last Topic | Next Topic  >

Forum Rules:
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

 

Flint Michigan online news magazine. We have lively web forums

Website Copyright © 2010 Flint Talk.com
Contact Webmaster - FlintTalk.com >