FAQFAQ   SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlistRegisterRegister  ProfileProfile   Log in[ Log in ]  Flint Talk RSSFlint Talk RSS

»Home »Open Chat »Political Talk  »Flint Journal »Political Jokes »The Bob Leonard Show  

Flint Michigan online news magazine. We have lively web forums


FlintTalk.com Forum Index > Political Talk

Topic: $4 million missing from Genesee County coffers?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
  Author    Post Post new topic Reply to topic
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Francis was hired in May of 2013 after serving in an interim capacity.

Each community must provide the state with a qualifying statement in order to issue municipal securities. The county was not qualified for the FY 2013 sent to the state on March 24, 2014. Resubmission resulted in the qualification being granted on May 30,2014.

The qualifying statement for FY ending September 2014 was submitted on March 25, 2015, (Municipality Code 250000) and was not qualified. The reason was the same as the previous year.

" Based upon the information provided in the qualifying statement, we have determined that Genesee County is not in material compliance with the following criteria as identified in section 303(3) of Public Act 34 of 2001."

Subsection (m) of the municipality ended the last fiscal year with a deficit in one or more funds and an acceptable deficit elimination plan has not been certified or conditionally approved.

Therefore Genesee County is not authorized to issue municipal securities under this act without further approval from the department.

Signed by Suzanne Schafer Administrator
Local Audit and Finance Department
517-373-3227

The qualification was approved on April 21,2015.
Post Wed Jul 01, 2015 3:52 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Page 6 of the 2014 county audit indicates the 2013 single audit results provided "instances of material weaknesses in the internal control structure" that was corrected in the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year.

The audit also states "budgetary control is maintained prior to the release of PO's to vendors." Doesn't this kind of refute the need for subsidizing the purchasing department?


Last edited by untanglingwebs on Sat Jul 04, 2015 8:00 am; edited 1 time in total
Post Sat Jul 04, 2015 7:46 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The forensic audit proposed by Gleason seems appropriate in light of all of the transfers from some departments to bolster the budget. Probably a $15,000 that would be well spent!

Page 17 of the audit cites transfers from the Delinquent tax Fund contributing to a general fund increase of $1,190.323.

Deficits (pg 55)

Brownfield Authority $9.866,711

GCARD $1,818,584

Sheriff Contracted Services $52,005

Internal Services Funds

Administrative services $2,335,392

Vehicles and equipment $36,857


Last edited by untanglingwebs on Sat Jul 04, 2015 7:59 am; edited 1 time in total
Post Sat Jul 04, 2015 7:54 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2015/07/county_clerk_calls_for_an_audi.html#incart_river
Post Fri Jul 10, 2015 9:58 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Genesee County clerk calls for an audit of his department, county board says just do it


Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com By Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com
Follow on Twitter
on July 08, 2015 at 6:16 PM, updated July 08, 2015 at 11:24 PM


Genesee County Clerk-Register John Gleason is pursuing an audit of his office to investigate whether money from the departments tech fund were misused. (Sarah Schuch | MLive.com)

GENESEE COUNTY, MI – The Genesee County clerk/register of deeds is calling on officials to do an audit of his office.

County leaders say he should go ahead and just do it.

County Clerk/Register John Gleason held a Wednesday morning news conference July 8, demanding an audit of his office to look into how funds were used from the department's Automation Fund. The fund, also known as the tech fund, is used for software and technology for the clerk's office.

"Funds were being pulled from the tech fund to take care of the general fund," Gleason said. "That is illegal. The law says it clearly. The money can be used from the tech fund, but they have to have my approval."

Gleason said the funds were used to pay salaries in his office and help take stress off of the county's general fund without his approval.

Genesee County Commission Chairman Jamie Curtis said he supports Gleason's demand for an audit of his office. Curtis said Gleason doesn't need the county board's permission to do so. He also said the county board does not approve the use of the tech fund without Gleason's OK.

"If he uses money from his budget, he can do an audit of his office," Curtis said. "I fully support him doing an audit. When he does, he will find that we have not violated any laws. Everything we do with the tech fund is on a list provided by the register of deeds first. We never initiate spending the money."

Curtis added that Gleason's initial request was unreasonable.

The first request was for $15,000 from the tech fund to do an audit of the past 12 years.

"The statute of limitations is seven years," Curtis said. "Doing more just didn't make sense. We're not denying him anything. He can do an audit if it is out of his budget."

Curtis did not say whether Gleason would have the county board's support using money from the tech fund if he adjusted his initial request to something members felt was more reasonable.

Gleason has opted to do an audit on a much smaller scale. He has hired Gabridge & Co., of Grand Rapids, to do an audit of his department reviewing the 2013-14 fiscal year. It will cost the department an estimated $2,700, which will come from Gleason's budget and not the tech fund.

"We are willing to have a one-year audit," Gleason said. "We feel it will be enough evidence that it will force a multiyear audit. We think that's a fair approach."

He said he won't know the results from the audit for at least 30 days after the company starts the process, which is slated for Monday, July 13. Gleason also said his initial 12-year audit request was to review the budgets since the tech fund's inception.

Over the past month, Gleason has kept a paper trail of his efforts to be put on the county board's agenda and have an audit done for his office with focus on the tech fund.

Both parties have sought legal counsel and have received conflicting information regarding the tech fund.

Since the news conference, Gleason said he received notification that salaries will no longer be pulled from the tech fund, and he has been added to the July 27 county board agenda.







countyemp
1 day ago


Genesee County undergoes an audit every single year - in compliance with State Law. If Gleason's audit turns up misspending of the Tech funds, people should be asking why the annual audit did not at least question the appropriateness of those expenditures.


burtonguy
1 day ago

@countyemp

Regular annual audits are just spot checks of internal controls and processes. To catch specific problems and/or fraud, a forensic audit is necessary.


patclawson
1 day ago


John Gleason is doing the right thing here and the citizens should support him. If he is asking for a 12-year audit, I am sure there is a valid reason. Ever since he replaced Mike Carr as County Clerk, he's been uncovering one mess after anothe


I don't understand why there should be any opposition to this, It's a no-brainer politically for the county to hire outside auditors. If the audit shows nothing is amiss, then the citizens win by knowing their money has not been misused. If the audit shows problems, the citizens still win because it exposes trouble hurting the taxpayers that can be cleaned up.

I find it very interesting that Jamie Curtis cited the statute of limitations and knows exactly when it expires. I wonder why.

Genesee County - and every other government body in Michigan - needs an Inspector General to conduct audits and investigations of this nature. The City of Flint has the Ombudsman, but we have seen over years how the city's Emergency Financial Managers and other so-called civic leaders have fought to gut that office or pack it with stooges to keep it from operating effectively. There is a reason for that opposition and the excuses of civic leaders about a lack of funding is a big red herring. What is totally missing in Flint and Genesee County government is any political will whatsoever to have an independent and honest cop on the beat who will protect the taxpayers and hold the big boys accountable.


Michigan citizens also need the right of petition audit. In other states where I have lived, like Virginia and Missouri, citizens can force an independent audit of government agencies by collecting petition signatures of voters in a quantity set by statute. This is long overdue in Michigan, and I call on Genesee County's delegation to the Michigan Legislature to introduce a bill to make this happen. This should be supported by both Democrats and Republicans because the need for sunshine and government accountability crosses party lines.


Pat Clawson

Swartz Creek, MI

patrickclawson@comcast.net



Ron Granger
1 day ago


This happens often in townships and counties. It is a constant battle to get them to comply with the law and not abuse restricted funds.


Thank you Mr. Gleason for trying to do the right thing. You better watch your back.


It is very apparent to anyone with knowledge of techniques on how to obstruct an investigation that forcing him to use funds from his own department to do the audit was an effort to stifle the effort.

I hope we see follow up coverage on this. Some stories cease to be followed after the major headlines. An example are the stories about the Augusta Township clerk and allegations from political foes. We saw multiple stories on police raids but never any followup.


Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com
1 day ago


@Ron Granger I plan on following up after the audit is finished. I think you are right. Like readers, I am curious to see what turns up, if anything.


Pure Michigan
1 day ago

In places like Detroit, Flint, and Pontiac it only makes sense to have an outside agency keep track of, and possibly keep control over the money. It may cost a little but in the long run it saves a lot and makes for more responsible government.

Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com


Jiquanda Johnson | jjohns16@mlive.com
1 day ago

@Pure Michigan Some governing bodies do audits annually. In this case, Gleason is saying his office has yet to have an audit. He also says that he has asked for one since he came into office.
Post Fri Jul 10, 2015 10:08 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The county audit shows money spent by the commissioners for an outside attorney opinion on the tech fund. Some in the county allege this opinion allowed them to use the tech money on salaries. However, it is interesting that they have now ceased to use them for this purpose.

The Tech funds were part of the lawsuit between Gleason and the County. The lawsuit alleged the county assumed control over all technology related services and funding. If this issue was resolved in court, what was the outcome?

Gleason's office wants to buy new technology, but the Tech fund lacks available resources over $30 thousand and not enough for the technology.
Post Fri Jul 10, 2015 10:18 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2013/03/sheriffs_retirement_fund_payme.html

Sheriff's retirement fund payments not the only benefit controversy for Genesee County

Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on March 26, 2013 at 7:00 PM


GENESEE COUNTY, MI -- County Sheriff Robert Pickell's retirement fund problems don't mark the first time there have been such issues in the county.

In 2005, the county granted its retiring human resources director an apparent record pension -- nearly $100,000 per year for the rest of his life despite having worked just 12 years at his county job.

Two great salary years sent Steven B. Stratton's annual pension through the roof -- to $98,902 annually, according to Flint Journal files.

The pension was actually more than Stratton earned as a full-time employee right before he retired but was boosted by additional work he did for the city of Flint.

After first allowing it, the county claimed it should have never allowed Stratton to count 14 years he was working for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees during a leave of absence from the city of Flint to build up his pension.

Commissioners eventually settled a lawsuit in 1999, agreeing to a new pension figure -- $54,906 per year.

In 1999, former Sheriff Joe Wilson's pension brought to light a practice of giving a kind of bonus to county employees who converted traditional pensions to 401-type retirement accounts.

Nearly 150 county employees who converted pensions in 1997 received the bonus of an actuary who estimated how much it would cost to fund pensions as if men had the life expectancy of a woman rather than a man or a mixed estimate of both sexes.

That practice added years to part of the formula used to figure retirement payments, and extra dollars to the pensions of men who converted their money into the 401-type accounts, reportedly including some top county officials.

Pickell and the county announced a settlement over $129,000 in payments the county made to the sheriff's 401-type retirement account -- payments officials said should never have been made.

Officials have said the county Human Resources Department was at fault for enrolling Pickell in the program because he was already a pension beneficiary due to his retirement from the Prosecutor's Office before he was appointed sheriff in 1999.

Under the settlement, Pickell agreed to repay $15,000 of those county general fund payments to his account.
Post Thu Jul 23, 2015 7:23 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

"In 1999, former Sheriff Joe Wilson's pension brought to light a practice of giving a kind of bonus to county employees who converted traditional pensions to 401-type retirement accounts.

Nearly 150 county employees who converted pensions in 1997 received the bonus of an actuary who estimated how much it would cost to fund pensions as if men had the life expectancy of a woman rather than a man or a mixed estimate of both sexes.

That practice added years to part of the formula used to figure retirement payments, and extra dollars to the pensions of men who converted their money into the 401-type accounts, reportedly including some top county officials."



Both the count and the city cut deals using the pension funds in an attempt to lessen the payroll costs. In hind sight these pension "perks" are now chocking both communities.
Post Thu Jul 23, 2015 7:31 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The allegations in Gleason's lawsuit are not new
Post Wed Jul 20, 2016 5:38 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Clerk accusing board of commissioners of misusing $200,000 in taxpayer money
Posted: Jul 18, 2016 1:37 PM CST
Updated: Jul 18, 2016 1:37 PM CST
By Brad Ivey, News Producer

GENESEE COUNTY, MI (WNEM) -

Genesee County Clerk John Gleason says his office is filing a lawsuit against the Genesee County Board of Commissioners, accusing them of misusing nearly $200,000 dollars in taxpayer money.

Today, Gleason announced the lawsuit, accusing the county of illegally spending $180,000 dollars earmarked for technology upgrades in the Register of Deeds office.

Gleason says the money was instead used to pay county union employees a $500 “bonus” instead.

Gleason says the money is also being improperly used to pay the salary of some employees.

$5,000 in attorney fees for the lawsuit are being paid for by the Michigan Association of Registers of Deeds.

Gleason says Commissioner Michael Lynch is the “parent chair” of the Clerk’s Office. Gleason claims this falls “solely on his lap” and accuses him of being neglectful and irresponsible.

TV5 reached out to Mike Lynch, who refused an interview with us. But he did say that the lawsuit is “frivolous” and that Gleason announced it today for political reasons. Lynch says Gleason is supporting his opponent in this August’s election, Marty Cousineau, and that making these accusations two weeks prior to the election is a political move hurt Lynch’s campaign.

TV5 also reached out to Jamie Curtis, who serves as the Commissioner’s chairperson. He also refused an interview, but said that the accusations are false and that the County did not misuse any funds earmarked for the tech fund.

Copyright 2016 WNEM (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.
Trending Articles
Body of 18-year-old recovered from lake

Authorities say the body of an 18-year-old suburban Detroit man who jumped from a boat into a lake in Livingston…

Read more: http://www.wnem.com/story/32470958/clerk-accusing-board-of-commissioners-of-misusing-200000-in-taxpayer-money#ixzz4EzXxEs4O
Post Wed Jul 20, 2016 5:45 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Official claims county late in paying mental health authority


Genesee County Clerk John Gleason speaks to the press regarding allegations of five million dollars owed to the Genesee Health System by Genesee County on Friday, July 22, 2016 at Dr. Martin Cousineau's office in Clio. Rachel Woolf | MLive.com
Rachel Woolf | rwoolf@mlive.com
Print Email Michael Kransz | mkransz@mlive.com By Michael Kransz | mkransz@mlive.com
Email the author


on July 22, 2016 at 11:58 PM, updated July 22, 2016 at 11:59 PM
GENESEE COUNTY, MI -- Genesee County owes millions to the county's mental health authority, and their lateness in payment could warrant referral to the state attorney general, a county official said.

Genesee County Clerk John Gleason held a press conference Friday, July 22, in which he said Genesee County had broken a timeline of paying the Genesee County Mental Health Authority more than $5 million in funds designated to the authority.

Although nearly half of that has been paid, the authority still awaits the other half, Gleason said.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

Gleason called the outstanding debt "illegal" and said services from the mental health authority have been hampered, and patients suffered, from the delay.

The press conference comes on the heels of Gleason's claims that the county board of commissioners has misused technology money that he maintains should be used for upgrades in his office.

Gleason is suing the county board over the technology fund.

Board chairman Jamie Curtis has questioned the lawsuit's timing ahead of the Aug. 2 primary election and has said the board voted no confidence in the county clerk's office.
Post Sat Jul 23, 2016 6:11 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

County controller resigns amid Genesee County Board of Commissioners
Amanda Emery | aemery@mlive.com By Amanda Emery | aemery@mlive.com
r
on August 05, 2016 at 7:00 PM, updated August 05, 2016 at 8:08 PM

GENESEE COUNTY, MI -- Genesee County Controller Keith Francis has submitted his resignation stating new opportunities, but also his displeasure with the results of Tuesday's election.

Voters shake up Genesee County Board of Commissioners

Voters shake up Genesee County Board of Commissioners

Four incumbents won't be on the Nov. 4 Election Day ballot this year.

Francis submitted his letter of resignation on Thursday, Aug. 4 to Genesee County Board Chairman Jamie Curtis. Commissioner Bryant Nolden said Francis will be leaving the county for a consulting opportunity.

According to the letter Francis submitted to Curtis on Thursday announcing his resignation, he said he was "dismayed at the choice made by the voters of Genesee County to replace" Curtis as well as County Commissioners Mike Lynch and Tony Brown.

Here is the letter in its entirety:

"Dear Commissioner Curtis,

I was very disappointed and dismayed at the choice made by the voters of Genesee County to replace you and Commissioners Lynch and Brown. Unfortunately for the County, the choices indicate a vote for change just for the sake of change, and not the accomplishments, effort and commitment of you and Commissioners Lynch and Brown.
ADVERTISING
inRead invented by Teads

Due to your hard work and leadership over the last seven and a half years as the 'defacto' County Executive, you have restored the County to financial stability by being fiscally responsible in an environment of shrinking revenues and continuing pressures to increase spending.

On your watch, the General Fund Unassigned Fund Balance grew from a low of only $600 thousand in 2009 to $16 million in 2015, and is forecasted to increase to $17.8 million at September 30, 2016. As a result of this improvement, Moody's and Standard & Poor's have upgraded the County's bond ratings, resulting in significant interest savings to the County, including the KWA and water treatment bonds.

Going forward the Board must exercise due care before adding fixed expenditures. For example, eliminating furlough days, while popular politically, would cost $2 million annually. And, building consolidation, while seemingly unpopular politically, would cost $2 million annually. And, building consolidation, while seemingly unpopular politically, needs to be on the agenda to be studied and evaluated before being dismissed outright. Given the deteriorating condition and inefficient layouts of the McCree and Administration buildings and the fixed costs of the outlying courts, the cost savings potential of a consolidation is significant.

During the last three and a half years, the strength and depth of the team in the Controller's office has increased and things are in 'good hands' under the leadership of the Assistant Controllers, Kristie Primeau and Joy Hawkins, the Risk Manager, Stephen Cooperrider, and the Pension Administrator, Tracy Khan.

I will be leaving the County for a consulting opportunity and my last day will be August 19.

I've enjoyed working with you and the Board and thank you for the opportunity.

Sincerely,

Keith R. Francis"

Francis' last day as Genesee County Controller will be Aug. 19. He has held the position since 2013, when he replaced George Martini.




Blue407

He's leaving for a reason, and it's not the one he stated in his resignation letter. See the post below. Crooks.


He won't be missed. To bad old Curtis doesn't do the taxpayers of the county a favor and resign now instead of waiting for the end of the term. Its going to take that long to just clean up all the coverups he is involved in.

4Shield InvestigationsImjustsayinZelenkoout2015Blue407LikeReply
Post Sat Aug 06, 2016 7:35 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Board chairman, clerk disagree on tech fund usage after lawsuit filed

Print Email Roberto Acosta | racosta1@mlive.com By Roberto Acosta | racosta1@mlive.com

on July 19, 2016 at 6:35 PM, updated July 20, 2016 at 2:30 PM
GENESEE COUNTY, MI – A game of political tennis has Genesee County Clerk John Gleason lobbing allegations in a lawsuit against the board of commissioners over what he claims is the misuse of a technology fund meant to furnish upgrades in his office.

But board chairman Jamie Curtis fired back at Gleason, questioning the lawsuit's timing ahead of the Aug. 2 primary election and noting the confidence level in the county clerk's office has eroded to the point of a no confidence vote on the position.

During a Tuesday afternoon press conference in response to a televised news report Monday evening, Curtis said Gleason did not adhere to not speaking about pending litigation and he felt the need to respond to the allegations.


"This is to set the record straight," he said, arguing Gleason made false claims about Curtis and Michael Lynch, public works chairman, being served the lawsuit, and the county illegally spending $6.5 million in technology funds. "It's untrue, it's not true."

Curtis said claims have come from Gleason since he came into office, including commissioner Michael Lynch making a unilateral decision to approve recent $500 bonuses.

Five votes are needed to pass an expenditure and the bonuses had been planned well in advance with unions, Curtis said, with the action protecting the county's bond rating and rewards employees that made sacrifices during the recession.

Holding his own press conference Tuesday at the clerk's office less than an hour later, Gleason wondered about the timing of those bonuses with absentee ballots having just gone out in some Genesee County communities.

He said a press conference was called Monday about "inappropriate expenditures out of the technology fund that is well defined and utilized in 82 counties appropriately."

"We're the only one that seems to be isolated in following the law," said Gleason, citing a law passed more than a decade ago regarding usage of technology funds and urged a forensic audit of the clerk's office going back several years.

An audit was started, Curtis said, but it was later ended after the firm was discredited in draft form which Gleason said is inaccurate.

"I believe the only way we're going to end the corruption, the unethical actions is to have a forensic audit," he said from behind the desk in his office, scattered with papers. "I want the FBI in here running an audit of our county. They can start with my office."

Curtis said he would be willing to sit down with Gleason and try to have out the differences, but he would not do it in a one-on-one scenario because he does not have trust in the clerk.

"We're not playing politics, we're doing our jobs. We're being fiscally responsible. We're doing the work that people put us here to do and we're doing it very well," he said. "It's sad when we have to be saddled with frivolous lawsuits and people in four-year, constitutional election cycles are trying to control this board from their offices by stacking the deck with people that they believe will be here only for their purposes and vote in the way they would want things to come forward."

Technology upgrades have taken place, Curtis said, citing the county board going form paperless to wires and jail from DOS and index cards to a computerized system for records.

"He's not willing to work with this board in any way, shape, or form when he has money," said Curtis, of Gleason sitting on $1.5 million, calling it all "a political stunt" on the clerk's part. "I can't stress enough when somebody makes a statement ask them to back it up."

Lynch said Gleason was once a staunch supporter of his, but the tables have now turned on their relationship and "the olive branch has been extended several times and it's not willing to be accepted" over the issue.

Pledging his support in the county commissioner race for Martin Cousineau whom is running against Lynch, Gleason said the lawsuit would be dropped and the issue resolved if the technology upgrades are completed.

"That's all we've ever wanted," he said. "We want the software."
Post Tue Aug 09, 2016 6:37 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

County and Genesee Health System locked in battle over $10 million

Print Email Molly Young | myoung7@mlive.com By Molly Young | myoung7@mlive.com
on August 09, 2016 at 7:00 AM, updated August 09, 2016 at 7:09 AM
GENESEE COUNTY, MI -- A battle is brewing over millions of dollars in taxpayer money.

On one side, Genesee Health System officials say the county must give $5.2 million to GHS.

County officials, however, say they don't owe GHS anything and counter that it's the health system that owes money to county coffers.



The dispute stems from an annual $10.2 million payment that GHS claims was owed last year.

The county paid $5 million but asked to be put on a payment plan for the balance.

When GHS refused, county officials took a deeper look at the money and determined that the county had actually overpaid the amount due for the past three years.

GHS CEO Danis Russell believes the county is wrong in its interpretation that the county overpaid by more than $5 million.

He said if the county didn't have money allotted to pay GHS, then it raises concerns about how funds are being spent.

"I think that the logic they're using is inaccurate. They don't understand (community mental health) financing. We were all in agreement that $10.2 million was the amount until the state sent them a letter saying that they should pay us, and then they recalculated everything and that's when they came up with the new number," Russel said. "We don't agree with that, and anybody who knows anything about the way community mental health services are financed would not agree with that."

Russel has asked Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton, who serves as corporation counsel for the county, to sort out the dispute.

Leyton said that when he and his team of lawyers reviewed the situation, they determined that they needed to better understand GHS financials to know if the county is paying the correct amount determined by law.

"It's basically accounting based upon the law, and that's what we're trying to get to – that's what this is about," Leyton said. "Nobody's doing anything underhanded or trying to not step up to whatever responsibilities, but we just want to make sure that we're on solid legal ground."

The two sides are expected to meet to discuss the matter before the end of the month.

It's not the only feud the county is fighting when it comes to money.

In July, Genesee County Clerk John Gleason filed a lawsuit against the board of commissioners over what he claims is the misuse of a $6.5 million technology fund meant to furnish upgrades in his office.

Then-county commission board chair Jamie Curtis called it a political stunt, and said technology upgrades have taken place, citing the county board going form paperless to wires and jail from DOS and index cards to a computerized system for records.

Gleason said the lawsuit would be dropped and the issue resolved if the technology upgrades are completed.
Post Tue Aug 09, 2016 6:43 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

From M-Live relevant comments:
Steve S. 15 hours ago
"Russel has asked Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton, who serves as corporation counsel for the county, to sort out the dispute."

I though this was in error, but the county website indicates that this is the case. However this short circuits the law that allows county executives when turn down representation by the corporation counsel to go to the Prosecuting Attorney. This is a very big news story and should have been reported.

cmhexec 15 hours ago
I obviously have an opinion on this issue, and others have a different one. But, I do believe everyone should have the same facts:

--The money that GHS thinks the county owes is not actually a payment. It is mostly federal dollars that were allocated to GHS that were being held in a county account per a previous agreement with the Commissioners.

--The Flint Water Crisis has not diverted any funds from regular GHS services. Water services have been paid for with special funds from the state, the feds, and private organizations.

--The majority of GHS funding is Medicaid and state general fund. Less than 2% of the GHS budget comes from Genesee County.

--The County Clerk has no official ties to GHS. Whatever the motives for publicizing the issue, he has no special information and his statements ( about the GHS issue) are accurate.

Badwamajama 16 hours ago
If you had a child that needed help from GHS, really needs help! You would not want GHS not to get there funds that they already have coming to them, especially for GHS that helps people.

Just don't sound right to me, not paying GHS who really helps people just to survive!. Actually not paying the funds for services already rendered is worse. There are a lot of people out there that need GHS! They help so many people in the county that need it, that would be a shame not for GHS to get there money.


Steve S. 15 hours ago
@sitango The article is about the former Mental Health Department which was rename Genesee Health System. The health plan is called Genesee Health Plan.


reader630 18 hours ago
I am unmoved that these two finance issues are related. Come on, FJ, stop being Gleason's shill. He politicized the CMH issue for his own office's gain. Mr. Russell was likely, quietly working the CMH issue with the county, the state, and now Leyton before Gleason made it public. CMH financing is complex, with a county-share built in, further impacted by Authority status for GHS.


Steve S. 15 hours ago
@reader630 The are related in that it is both misuse by the county commission. Gleason doesn't need to shill he is completely unopposed.




F
Post Wed Aug 10, 2016 7:39 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
  Display posts from previous:      
Post new topic Reply to topic

Jump to:  
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

Last Topic | Next Topic  >

Forum Rules:
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

 

Flint Michigan online news magazine. We have lively web forums

Website Copyright © 2010 Flint Talk.com
Contact Webmaster - FlintTalk.com >