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Topic: the Eric Mays Saga contiues
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint Emergency Manager Darnell Earley places five-minute limit on city council comments
Dominic Adams | dadams5@mlive.com By Dominic Adams | dadams5@mlive.com
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on March 06, 2014 at 4:30 PM, updated March 06, 2014 at 6:29 PM


FLINT, MI – Perhaps it was the comment about masturbation.

Maybe it was the 45 minutes one council member used to address the public.

Or it could have been the back and forth between a pair of council members during a meeting last month.

But on Wednesday, March 5, Flint Emergency Manager Darnell Earley signed an executive order limiting city council members to five minutes each at the end of council meetings to make referrals, to respond to public comment or to discuss city issues.

“This order is intended to make good use of council meeting time while conducting the business of the city; it is also a very important tenet of the transition management plan, which will help assess the council’s readiness for moving toward a transition advisory board and ultimately home rule order,” Earley said in a statement.

Earley, through a city spokesperson, declined further comment.

The order comes following a dialogue between two council members at the Feb. 17 council meeting. A third councilman likened their discussion to “masturbation.”

Following a lengthy exchange between Eric Mays and Wantwaz Davis over seniors' water bills and how each was representing their constituents, Councilman Joshua Freeman said it reminded him of something he heard a Flint planning commissioner once say after a long council meeting.

“Speeches are a lot like masturbation – it feels good, but it doesn’t produce anything,” said Fourth Ward Councilman Joshua Freeman, referring to public comments made at a previous meeting where council members made long statements. “So, I would suggest to the public that they look toward action and not 45-minute speeches once a month.”

Council President Scott Kincaid said he spoke with Earley about the new order earlier this week.

The new rule will work toward “ensuring the business of the city of Flint conducted at city council meetings occurs in an orderly, dignified, and efficient manner, reflecting the level of professionalism deserved by council members, city officials and staff, and members of the public who sacrifice their free time to attend meetings,” the order reads.

City Clerk Inez Brown will keep time during council members’ remarks and will give them notice when there is one minute left.

“Otherwise, council members shall not make comments during council meetings, other than to respond to roll call or to respond directly to a request of the council president, or at his recognition,” the order reads.

On Thursday, March 6, Mays called Earley’s order outrageous and embarrassing.

“It’s a breach of an elected official’s freedom of speech,” Mays said. “I’ll be asking organizations like the ACLU, NAACP, Concerned Pastors and every resident in the city of Flint to speak out against this procedure.”

In December, Earley issued an order that said Mays could communicate with Earley using only email, that Mays couldn’t talk to city staff and directed First Ward residents to discuss their concerns with City Clerk Inez Brown instead of Mays.

That order also said Mays cannot be disruptive at council meetings and can only address council when Kincaid recognizes Mays.

The December order came after Mays refused to submit to the resignation request of Earley, Mayor Dayne Walling and numerous council members following Mays’ arrest Nov. 30 and subsequent misdemeanor charges on suspicion of drunken driving and marijuana possession.

Mays is set to appear in court next week after pleading not guilty to all charges.

Kincaid said he supports Earley’s recent order because it will narrow the focus for meetings – which Kincaid are to address the business of the city and hear from constituents.

This is the first time council will have such a rule since Kincaid was elected in 1985, he said.

“We’ve never needed it before,” Kincaid said. “We’ve never had council members who wanted to talk for an hour, either, and it will prevent the dialogue between council members from going back and forth.

“It shouldn’t take me, nor anyone else, more than five minutes to respond to someone’s issue pertaining to the city. In my 29 years, I’ve never sat through a council meeting like the last one.”

Councilman Sheldon Neeley said he believes the order was made for one specific reason.

“I think this rule was designed just to curb the comments of one council member,” Neeley said, declining to name the council member. “We have to figure out a way to operate our meetings effectively after the emergency manager’s orders are gone. I believe we have in the past and I believe we can in the future.”

Dominic Adams is a reporter for The Flint Journal. Contact him at dadams5@mlive.com or 810-241-8803. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook or Google+.
Post Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:08 pm 
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00SL2
F L I N T O I D

mlive.com
Judge denies request to step aside in drunken driving case against Flint City Councilman Eric Mays
Dominic Adams | dadams5@mlive.com By Dominic Adams | dadams5@mlive.com
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on March 10, 2014 at 4:00 PM, updated March 10, 2014 at 4:02 PM

FLINT, MI – The criminal case against City Councilman Eric Mays will stay with Flint District Judge Nathaniel C. Perry III.

Perry on Monday, March 10, denied a motion by special prosecutor Michael J. Gildner that asked Perry to recuse himself on the basis that he had recused himself in a separate case involving Mays.

Gildner wanted Perry to step aside because Perry recused himself in a case involving Mays last year.

In 2012, Perry recused himself from hearing a misdemeanor charge of disrupting a meeting of a public body against Mays in 2012.

Mays was eventually convicted in the case after he went over a three-minute per person time limit during a meeting about tax abatements in July, 2012, inside Flint City Council Chambers and was arrested. Mays told The Flint Journal he paid a $425 to fulfill sentence.

"I have sat on cases involving other city council persons," Perry said before Monday's ruling, adding that he withdrew from Mays' case in 2012 because he had knowledge about the case before it came to his court.

Eric Mays.jpgEric MaysMLive.com File

In the latest case, Mays is charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated, possession of marijuana, no proof of insurance, failure to report an accident and refusal to be fingerprinted.

There is another pretrial in the case at 2 p.m. March 17.

Mays, 55, pleaded not guilty at his initial court appearance in December to five misdemeanor charges after police found Mays trying to change a tire on a vehicle with four flats at about 2:50 a.m., Nov. 30. Police said the vehicle involved had been traveling north in the southbound lanes of Interstate-475 on four flat tires near Carpenter Road.

Flint Emergency Manager Darnell Earley, Mayor Dayne Walling and multiple city councilmen called for Mays to resign following the arrest.

When Mays wouldn’t resign, Earley signed an executive order that says Mays can only talk to Earley using email, bars Mays from communicating with city staff and directs First Ward residents to discuss their concerns with City Clerk Inez Brown instead of Mays.

The order also says Mays cannot be disruptive at council meetings and can only address council when President Scott Kincaid recognizes him.

© 2014 MLive.com. All rights reserved.
---
Source:
http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2014/03/flint_city_councilman_eric_may_5.html
Post Mon Mar 10, 2014 7:56 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Watched the conclusion of the Flint council meeting in which Eric once again exposed his mighty ego. The expression "a legend in his own mind" had to have been created for people like Eric. He tries so hard to look brilliant that he looks stupid. Once again we see Eric take the stance as the one "savior" of the city. So his father was a Pastor, what does that have to do with council?

Eric interrupts other speakers and council members. He doesn't allow them to even finish their sentences at times. The body language says it all. Jackie Poplar was sitting with her back towards him. Nolden slouched and looked disgusted. Poplar, Nolden, and Freeman all left at one time or another.

And I have to point out that Kincaid needs to regain control of the meetings. He stopped Davis from feuding with Mays, but allowed Mays to interrupt everyone including Davis. Mays asks for permission to speak and doesn't wait to see if it is granted.
Post Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:03 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The grants hearing was on tv 17 Sunday. Mays once again wanted to brag about his alleged greatness. An observer made some comment to him and Mays spent the next 10 or so minutes criticizing the audience person. Megan Hunter needs to keep control of her hearing and set time limits. Mays and Councilman Davis both asked for job training programs.

Too many speakers wanted to emphasize their leadership qualities and the focus was short on comments about how the current funds were being allocated. I did agree with Harry Ryan on one issue. The HUD HOME rules allow the city to create programs to create Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) and even describe the process. Mt tabor attempted to develop a housing organization for years before gving up.
Post Tue Mar 25, 2014 7:24 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Eric Mays and his attorney Frank Manley have parted ways. Manley made a motion to withdraw as attorney for Mays, which was agreed to by Special Prosecutor Mike Gildner and Judge Perry. Mays will be representing himself.

Mays has not had a very successful history representing himseld. He was convicted in 2012 when he represented himself after being charged for being disorderly in a city council meeting. He also was not successful in his fight against several ppo's filed against him in Flint and Saginaw.
Post Mon Apr 28, 2014 5:23 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The First Ward needs to watch Channel 17 at noon on Sundays. last Sunday they would have seen Eric Mays in action. He was as rude and disorderly as usual. To hear hi tell it he alone knows everything.

Kincaid finanally got stronger and attempted to put a shorter leash on Mays. But Mays does not care if he is recognized to speak because he is going to sound off anyway.So much for his Robert's Rules of Order. Mays is like a spoiled child demanding attention

He is starting to get his comeuppance as the meeting came to an abrupt halt at he end. The meeting had lasted hours to long and council members were tired. When Kincaid announced it was time for council to comment and Mays seized the floor the other council members got up and left ne by one. A hasty "meeting adjourned was announced and there were no motions made to adjourn.The look on Mays face was priceless as he realized he no longer had a forum from which to pontificate from.

One of my friends that thought the new rules by Earley were rough now says she understands why they were necessary.
Post Wed Apr 30, 2014 8:42 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint Councilman Eric Mays leaves council table after police called to remove him
Print Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 01, 2014 at 9:34 AM, updated May 01, 2014 at 9:35 AM

FLINT, MI -- City Councilman Eric Mays walked away from his seat at the council table Wednesday, May 1, after President Scott Kincaid asked police to remove him.

Mays, a first-term councilman who represents the city's 1st Ward, had objected to Kincaid ruling him out of order during a council meeting on a proposed 2014-2015 city budget.

The two argued as Mays tried to appeal Kincaid's ruling that he was out of order to the rest of the City Council.
Kincaid finally told Mays that he would have an officer remove Mays from the meeting if he didn't stop talking.

Mays kept talking but then got up when three Flint police officers who were in the council chambers for Wednesday's meeting approached the council table.

Mays grabbed his briefcase and took a seat in the audience.

"The police were fixing to come and get me," Mays said after returning to the council table a few minutes later once Kincaid and Councilman Sheldon Neeley suggested he could return.

"I was publicly embarrassed," Mays said.
Mays continued to talk during the rest of the meeting but had no further arguments with Kincaid.

Wednesday's incident isn't the first time police have been called to remove Mays from a council meeting.

Before he was elected, Mays was escorted by police out of a 2012 public hearing at City Hall after speaking out against proposed tax abatements for downtown Flint buildings.

In that case, an assistant city attorney asked Mays to take his seat after he went over a 3-minute per-person time limit at the podium. Mays refused, saying he should be given more time to speak because he had been interrupted earlier in the hearing.

Mays was convicted of a misdemeanor charge of disrupting a public meeting in 2013 as a result and was sentenced to pay $425 in fines and court costs.
Post Fri May 02, 2014 3:24 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The comments on M-Live were not kind to either Mays or the First Ward. There was a strong inference that Mays suffered from a mental problem and needed to see a doctor. They then questioned the First Ward for electing him.

In the court of public opinion, both Mays and the First Ward are defective.
Post Sat May 03, 2014 6:18 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

I felt this was the most consise and competent response on M-live:


kb01 2 days ago
@mmmjive at some point though in a functional government setting, one has to determine when enough long-winded rabble rousing is enough! Standing on principal is one thing. Being disruptive and obstructive (and yes the Republicans are very good at it too) to the point where nothing is accomplished is another which is Mr. Mays favorite type of Gov. It's unacceptable for a City on the brink to continue to operate in such a foolish manner. Congrats to Mr. Kincaid for doing the right thing!
Post Sat May 03, 2014 7:20 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Judge knocks down Genesee Towers lawsuit filed by Flint City Councilman Eric Mays
Print Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 12, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Flint Circuit Judge Geoffrey Neithercut has granted the city of Flint a summary deposition in a lawsuit filed by Flint Councilman Eric Mays in 2013, a lawsuit that sought to block the demolition.

FLINT, MI -- Genesee Towers has been reduced to a pile of rubble, and so has the lawsuit that aimed to keep it standing.

Genesee Circuit Judge Geoffrey Neithercut granted the city of Flint's motion for summary judgement in the civil lawsuit filed by Flint Councilman Eric Mays in a hearing today, May 12.

"You need to go work on the budget, Mr. Mays ...," Neithercut told the councilman after making his decision. "I don't see anything ... that the court would need to decide ... That building is torn down ... It's a pile of rubble that's being hauled away."

Before he was elected to the council, Mays sued the city and Uptown Reinvestment Corp. after the city sold the old Genesee Towers building in downtown Flint to Uptown for $1 in August 2012.

Mays said today that he's not sure whether he will file a motion asking Neithercut to reconsider his decision. Flint spokesman Jason Lorenz would not comment, saying the city does not comment on pending litigation.

"Even though it's done, I don't take the city off the hook yet because we haven't examined the legality of the transfer," said Mays, who acted as his own attorney today.

Uptown received $5.6 million in a combination loan and grant from the Michigan Revitalization Program to raze Genesee Towers, and the building was imploded in late December.

Mays was convicted in a separate, criminal court case also related to downtown redevelopment in 2013 after he was arrested for disrupting a public hearing about tax abatements in July 2012.
Mays was ordered to pay $425 in fines and court cost and spend a day in jail, with credit for one day served, in the disruption case.

As a part of his appeal in that case, Mayes filed the civil lawsuit against Uptown and the city.
Post Mon May 12, 2014 6:11 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Mays was seen in the law library last Friday working on his case.

He goes to court later this month on his case on the traffic issue. His attorney Frank Manley withdrew as his attorney and Mays is representing himself. If he had any sense he would be very nervous. Instead the Mike Killbreath show reported that Mays felt Manley's reason for leaving was political as Manley's wife is running for Judge. Could it be that Manley's client refused to take his advice?
Post Mon May 12, 2014 6:16 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Ted Jankowski 7 hours ago
Wow It sounds like the Judge was hearing a different case than the one in the courtroom. Telling Mays he needs to go to work on the budget. It's almost like the case was decided before it was ever heard in the courtroom. Whether you think Mays is a joke or a genius. The comments in the courtroom should have been focused on the case at hand. Not his status as councilman.


wasit4sure
wasit4sure 1 hour ago
@Ted Jankowski Ted, I was thinking the very same thing while reading the article before I saw your comments. Whether you care for Mr. Mays or not, what kind of judge makes unrelated comments on the case from the bench and uses it has his own personal and political soapbox? If I were Mr. Mays, I would drop this appeal and file for a judiciary review hearing against the judge for conduct unbecoming and improper judiciary behavior from the bench.
Post Tue May 13, 2014 9:33 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint councilman says he's 'ready to roll,' will act as his own attorney in drunken driving case
Print Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 19, 2014 at 5:00 PM, updated May 19, 2014 at 5:14 PM

.

FLINT, MI --City Councilman Eric Mays says he's "ready to roll," representing himself in a drunken driving case that's scheduled to start Tuesday, May 20, in Flint District Court.

Mays faces four misdemeanor charges tied to a November arrest in which police allege they found him trying to change a tire on a vehicle with four flats.

The charges against Mays include operating a vehicle while intoxicated, possession of marijuana, no proof of insurance and refusal to be fingerprinted.

The councilman said last month that he might handle his own defense in the case, and said today, May 19, that's what he intends to do.

Just last week, Mays also acted as his own attorney in a civil lawsuit that sought to stop the demolition of the Genesee Towers.

Genesee Circuit Judge Geoffrey Neithercut instead granted the city of Flint's motion for summary judgement of the complaint.

Mays said today that he's served a subpoena, calling for emergency manager Darnell Earley to appear as a witness in the case against him.

Earley, Mayor Dayne Walling and Council President Scott Kincaid asked for Mays to resign in December, the month after his arrest.

The councilman, also a candidate for state House of Representatives, has said Earley's decision to ask him to resign could have an impact on the jury pool.

MLive-The Flint Journal could not immediately reach special prosecutor Michael J. Gildner for comment on the case today.
Post Mon May 19, 2014 4:28 pm 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Flint Council president calls police to remove Councilman Eric Mays for second time this month
Print Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com By Ron Fonger | rfonger1@mlive.com
on May 19, 2014 at 8:04 PM, updated May 19, 2014 at 9:52 PM

Two Flint police officers ask Councilman Eric Mays to leave his seat at today's City Council meeting after officers were called to remove him.
Ron Fonger | MLive.com

FLINT, MI -- Police were called today, May 19, to remove city Councilman Eric Mays from a meeting for the second time this month.

With council meeting to discuss a proposal to sell a section of water transmission line to Genesee County for $3.9 million, Mays clashed with council President Scott Kincaid, who called police to remove Mays after ruling him out of order.

Two uniformed officers approached the 1st Ward councilman but pulled back from removing Mays after a 20 minute recess was approved by the council.

Kincaid's call for police came after he and Mays argued over how the meeting was being run, including what order Kincaid was recognizing his colleagues to speak.

"I'm not going to let you lie to these people Scott," Mays said to Kincaid. "You don't rule this council."

"I'm running the meeting, not you," Kincaid told Mays before calling for police.

The clash is the second this month in which officers responded to Kincaid's request to remove Mays from a council meeting.

On May 1, Mays walked away from his seat at the council table in that meeting as police approached.

After a 20-minute recess, Mays said he was "embarrassed by what happened here today."

He criticized Kincaid for allowing emergency manager Darnell Earley to leave the meeting shortly after it started -- even as Mays attempted to question him.

This month doesn't mark the first time police have been called to remove Mays from a council meeting.

Before he was elected, Mays was escorted by police out of a 2012 public hearing at City Hall after speaking out against proposed tax abatements for downtown Flint buildings.

In that case, an assistant city attorney asked Mays to take his seat after he continued talking beyond a 3-minute per-person time limit.

Mays refused, and he was convicted of a misdemeanor charge of disrupting a public meeting in 2013 as a result and was sentenced to pay $425 in fines and court costs.
Post Tue May 20, 2014 6:20 am 
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untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Quote
"Kincaid's call for police came after he and Mays argued over how the meeting was being run, including what order Kincaid was recognizing his colleagues to speak.

"I'm not going to let you lie to these people Scott," Mays said to Kincaid. "You don't rule this council."

"I'm running the meeting, not you," Kincaid told Mays before calling for police."

_______________________________________________________________________

Once again Mays tries to wrest control of a meeting. Kudos to Kincaid for insisting on running an orderly meeting and not allowing Mays to display his ignorance. At the meeting on Governance held at Mott College 10 days ago, Mays tried to intercede and was shut out.

And just like council meetings, Mays has his cronies writing on m-live about how Mays is being mistreated and how Kincaid has a vendetta. Obviously only the First Ward wants to hear Mays rant. At a recent council meeting,the rest of the council got up and left Mays to listen to himself.

It is sad that he doesn't recognize how he keeps repeating his words during his tirades. These tirades are usually filled with veiled threats against whomever he believe is challenging him. Kincaid was maintaining order so where did the lying comment come from. Just another Mays failed tactic.
Post Tue May 20, 2014 6:34 am 
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